Commands by pcholt (1)

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print all characters of a file using hexdump
'od -c' works like 'hexdump -c' but is available on other operating systems that don't ship with hexdump (e.g. solaris).

Split a file one piece at a time, when using the split command isn't an option (not enough disk space)
bs = buffer size (basically defined the size of a "unit" used by count and skip) count = the number of buffers to copy (16m * 32 = 1/2 gig) skip = (32 * 2) we are grabbing piece 3...which means 2 have already been written so skip (2 * count) i will edit this later if i can to make this all more understandable

recursively walk down no more than three levels and grab any file with an extension of mp3, mpg, mpeg, or avi

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

remove *.jpg smaller than 500x500

Show directories in the PATH, one per line
The output of "echo $PATH" is hard to read, this is much easier. The parentheses ensure that the change to the input field separator (IFS) only happens the the sub shell and not affecting the current shell.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Monitor a file with tail with timestamps added
This is useful when watching a log file that does not contain timestamps itself. If the file already has content when starting the command, the first lines will have the "wrong" timestamp when the command was started and not when the lines were originally written.

Rotate a pdf by 90 degrees CW

Broadcast your shell thru ports 5000, 5001, 5002 ...
run 'nc yourip 5000', 'nc yourip 5001' or 'nc yourip 5002' elsewhere will produce an exact same mirror of your shell. This is handy when you want to show someone else some amazing stuff in your shell without giving them control over it.


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