Commands by phattmatt (3)

  • If you are an unlucky soul behind a corporate firewall you will likely find that downloading gpg keys is blocked. This is because the hkp protocol uses port 11371 by default to transfer the key. By adding "hkp://" to the beginning of the hostname and ":80" to the end you are asking gpg to try using port 80 to connect (less likely to be blocked by a firewall). This relies on the remote server answering to requests over port 80. Show Sample Output


    0
    sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keys.gnupg.net:80 --recv-keys [key to get here]
    phattmatt · 2013-07-23 08:29:40 0
  • Requires software found at: http://lpccomp.bc.ca/remserial/ Remote [A] (with physical serial port connected to device) ./remserial -d -p 23000 -s "115200 raw" /dev/ttyS0 & Local [B] (running the program that needs to connect to serial device) Create a SSH tunnel to the remote server: ssh -N -L 23000:localhost:23000 user@hostwithphysicalserialport Use the locally tunnelled port to connect the local virtual serial port to the remote real physical port: ./remserial -d -r localhost -p 23000 -l /dev/remser1 /dev/ptmx & Example: Running minicom on machine B using serial /dev/remser1 will actually connect you to whatever device is plugged into machine A's serial port /dev/ttyS0.


    1
    remserial -d -p 23000 -s "115200 raw" /dev/ttyS0 &
    phattmatt · 2012-11-19 17:56:02 1
  • Runs the identify command (from ImageMagick) on each jpg file in the current directory and returns image details according to the format parameter. The example here returns: Filename FileSize Compression Width Height More information about the available format options can be found here: http://www.imagemagick.org/script/escape.php I usually redirect the output to a text file using "> listofdetails.txt" at the end. Spreadsheet magic can then be applied. Show Sample Output


    0
    for file in *.jpg; do identify -format '%f %b %Q %w %h' $file; done
    phattmatt · 2012-11-16 10:06:35 1

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