Commands by philipsd6 (0)

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Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Open a file at the specified line
You may also use +line:column syntax.

Pipe STDOUT to vim
The hyphen tells vim to open from STDOUT - saves having to create temporary files.

Create a large test file (taking no space).

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Copy the currently playing song in MPD to somewhere else

Run netcat to server files of current folder

Start screen in detached mode
Start screen in detached mode, i.e., already running on background. The command is optional, but what is the purpose on start a blank screen process that way? It's useful when invoking from a script (I manage to run many wget downloads in parallel, for example).

View all file operator expressions for any file, test, stat
Applies each file operator using the built-in test. $ testt /home/askapache/.sq /home/askapache/.sq -a True - file exists. -d True - file is a directory. -e True - file exists. -r True - file is readable by you. -s True - file exists and is not empty. -w True - the file is writable by you. -x True - the file is executable by you. -O True - the file is effectively owned by you. -G True - the file is effectively owned by your group. -N True - the file has been modified since it was last read. Full Function: testt () { local dp; until [ -z "${1:-}" ]; do dp="$1"; [[ ! -a "$1" ]] && dp="$PWD/$dp"; command ls -w $((${COLUMNS:-80}-20)) -lA --color=tty -d "$dp"; [[ -d "$dp" ]] && find "$dp" -mount -depth -wholename "$dp" -printf '%.5m %10M %#15s %#9u %-9g %#5U %-5G %Am/%Ad/%AY %Cm/%Cd/%CY %Tm/%Td/%TY [%Y] %p\n' -a -quit 2> /dev/null; for f in a b c d e f g h L k p r s S t u w x O G N; do test -$f "$dp" && help test | sed "/-$f F/!d" | sed -e 's#^[\t ]*-\([a-zA-Z]\{1\}\) F[A-Z]*[\t ]* True if#-\1 "'$dp'" #g'; done; shift; done }

To print a specific line from a file
You can get one specific line during any procedure. Very interesting to be used when you know what line you want.


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