Commands by piccobello (3)

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Temporarily suspend and unsuspend a foreground job
Press ^Z, do what you need to do on the shell, then input % to resurrect the suspended job.

move contents of the current directory to the parent directory, then remove current directory.
Robust means of moving all files up by a directory. Will handle dot files, filenames containing spaces, and filenames with almost any printable characters. Will not handle filenames containing a single-quote (but if you are moving those, it's time to go yell at whoever created them in the first place).

Clone /
Clone linux installation.

Grab just the title of a youtube video
There's another version on here that uses GET but some people don't have lwp-request, so here's an alternative. It's also a little shorter and should work with most youtube URLs since it truncates at the first &

Replace multiple spaces with semicolon

Delete all non-printing characters from a file
tr has some predefined sets of characters that are more convenient to use than characters codes

Functions to display, save and restore $IFS
You can display, save and restore the value of $IFS using conventional Bash commands, but these functions, which you can add to your ~/.bashrc file make it really easy. To display $IFS use the function ifs shown above. In the sample output, you can see that it displays the characters and their hexadecimal equivalent. This function saves it in a variable called $saveIFS: $ sifs () { saveIFS=$IFS; } Use this function to restore it $ rifs () { IFS=$saveIFS; } Add this line in your ~/.bashrc file to save a readonly copy of $IFS: $ declare -r roIFS=$IFS Use this function to restore that one to $IFS $ rrifs () { IFS=$roIFS; }

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Repeat a portrait eight times so it can be cut out from a 6"x4" photo and used for visa or passport photos
Yes, You could do it in the GIMP or even use Inkscape to auto-align the clones, but the command line is so much easier. NOTE: The +clone and -clone options are just to shorten the command line instead of typing the same filename eight times. It might also speed up the montage by only processing the image once, but I'm not sure. "+clone" duplicates the previous image, the following two "-clone"s duplicate the first two and then the first four images. NOTE2: The -frame option is just so that I have some lines to cut along. BUG: I haven't bothered to calculate the exact geometry (width and height) of each image since that was not critical for the visa photos I need. If it matters for you, it should be easy enough to set using the -geometry flag near the end of the command. For example, if you have your DPI set to 600, you could use "-geometry 800x1200!" to make each subimage 1⅓ x 2 inches. You may want to use ImageMagick's "-density 600" option to put a flag in the JPEG file cuing the printer that it is a 600 DPI image. BUG2: ImageMagick does not autorotate images based on the EXIF information. Since the portrait photo was taken with the camera sideways, I made the JPEG rotate using jhead like so: jhead -autorot 2007-08-25-3685.jpg

Bypass 1000 Entry limit of Active Directory with ldapsearch
That command bypass the entry limit specifing page results size, when the search arrive to the limit ldapsearch magically reiterate it from the last entry.


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