Commands by pikachu88 (0)

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Flush DNS cache in MacOS 10.5

How To Get the Apache Document Root
Grabs the Apache config file (yielded from httpd) and returns the path specified as DocumentRoot.

Check if your ISP is intercepting DNS queries
It's somewhat common ISPs to intercept DNS queries at port 53 and resolve them at their own. To check if your ISP is intercepting your DNS queries just type this command in the terminal. "#.abc" it's an OK answer. But if you get something like "I am not an OpenDNS resolver.", yep, you are beign cheated by your ISP.

recursive search and replace old with new string, inside files
This command find all files in the current dir and subdirs, and replace all occurances of "oldstring" in every file with "newstring".

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Work out numerical last month
Work out last months numerical value.

Listing directory content of a directory with a lot of entries
Ever wanted to get the directory content with 'ls' or 'find' and had to wait minutes until something was printed? Perl to the rescue. The one-liner above(redirected to a file) took less than five seconds to run in a directory with more man 2 million files. One can adapt it to e.g. delete files that match a certain pattern.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Always tail/edit/grep the latest file in a directory of timestamped files
zsh only If you have this command in your history, you can always re-run it and have it reference the latest file. The glob matches all timestamped files and then the resulting array is sorted by modification time (m) and then the first element in the sorted array is chosen (the latest)

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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