Commands by pingiun (1)

  • First the find command finds all files in your current directory (.). This is piped to xargs to be able to run the next shell pipeline in parallel. The xargs -P argument specifies how many processes you want to run in parallel, you can set this higher than your core count as the duration reading is mainly IO bound. The -print0 and -0 arguments of find and xargs respectively are used to easily handle files with spaces or other special characters. A subshell is executed by xargs to have a shell pipeline for each file that is found by find. This pipeline extracts the duration and converts it to a format easily parsed by awk. ffmpeg reads the file and prints a lot of information about it, grep extracts the duration line. cut and sed cut out the time information, and tr converts the last . to a : to make it easier to split by awk. awk is a specialized programming language for use in shell scripts. Here we use it to split the time elements in 4 variables and add them up. Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -print0 | xargs -0 -P 40 -n 1 sh -c 'ffmpeg -i "$1" 2>&1 | grep "Duration:" | cut -d " " -f 4 | sed "s/.$//" | tr "." ":"' - | awk -F ':' '{ sum1+=$1; sum2+=$2; sum3+=$3; sum4+=$4 } END { printf "%.0f:%.0f:%.0f.%.0f\n", sum1, sum2, sum3, sum4 }'
    pingiun · 2019-03-01 20:21:48 23

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