Commands by pipeliner (5)

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sort list of email addresses by domain.tld
email random list can be created here: https://www.randomlists.com/email-addresses

Get creation date of a file on ext2-3-4 fs
Return the creation date of a file on ext2, 3, 4 filesystems, because stat command won't show it. Useful on ubuntu, debian, and else

Secure copy from one server to another without rsync and preserve users, etc
Source: http://unix.derkeiler.com/Newsgroups/comp.unix.shell/2008-04/msg00068.html

Auto download Ubuntu 10.04 LTS with super fast zsync
Need to have rc iso pre-downloaded before running command.

Push your present working directory to a stack that you can pop later
If are a Bash user and you are in a directory and need to go else where for a while but don't want to lose where you were, use pushd instead of cd. cd /home/complicated/path/.I/dont/want/to/forget pushd /tmp cd thing/in/tmp popd (returns you to /home/complicated/path/.I/dont/want/to/forget)

Show which programs are listening on TCP ports
Alternative: $ ss -tlpn

A little bash daemon =)
A little bash daemon

Use bash history with process substitution
Bash has a great history system of its commands accessed by the ! built-in history expansion operator (documented elsewhere on this site or on the web). You can combine the ! operator inside the process redirection

Have your sound card call out elapsed time.
Useful contexts : You are doing yoga or some other physical training in which you are holding a position. Or you practice the pomodoro productivity technique. Or your girlfriend said "We're leaving in 40 minutes". Design details: sleep executes before espeak to give you a 5 seconds head start. espeak is run in the background so it doesn't mess up the timing.

send file to remote machine and unzip using ssh
This version transfers gzipped data which is unzipped as it arrives at the remote host.


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