Commands by poffey21 (1)

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I tried out on my Mac, jot to generate sequence ( 0,25,50,..), you can use 'seq' if it is linux to generate numbers, need curl installed on the machine, then it rocks. @Satya

Grab a list of MP3s out of Firefox's cache
Grab a list of MP3s (with full path) out of Firefox's cache Ever gone to a site that has an MP3 embedded into a pesky flash player, but no download link? Well, this one-liner will yank the *full path* of those tunes straight out of FF's cache in a clean list. Shorter and Intuitive version of the command submitted by (TuxOtaku)

reverse-i-search: Search through your command line history
"What it actually shows is going to be dependent on the commands you've previously entered. When you do this, bash looks for the last command that you entered that contains the substring "ls", in my case that was "lsof ...". If the command that bash finds is what you're looking for, just hit Enter to execute it. You can also edit the command to suit your current needs before executing it (use the left and right arrow keys to move through it). If you're looking for a different command, hit Ctrl+R again to find a matching command further back in the command history. You can also continue to type a longer substring to refine the search, since searching is incremental. Note that the substring you enter is searched for throughout the command, not just at the beginning of the command." - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/using-bash-history-more-efficiently

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

prints line numbers
the sed way to print line numbers

show installed but unused linux headers, image, or modules
will show: installed linux headers, image, or modules: /^ii/!d avoiding current kernel: /'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d only application names: s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/ avoiding stuff without a version number: /[0-9]/!d

Produce 10 copies of the same string

make a list of movies(.m3u).

Alias for lazy tmux create/reattach


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