Commands by poluamar (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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open manpage and search for a string
This will open the manpage for "foobar", and display all instances of "searched_string". You can traverse through them by pressing "n"

Copy with progress

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Transfer Entire recursive from one host to another. Only copies files that are newer or do not exist
From opposite host To copy remote to local rsync -aE -e "ssh -pPortnumber" user@hostA:directory target_dir

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Annoying PROMPT_COMMAND animation
unset PROMPT_COMMAND to disable.

remove ^M characters from file using sed
removing ^M characters from file with sed

Convert seconds into minutes and seconds
This is a very simple way to input a large number of seconds and get a more useful value in minutes and seconds. Avoids useless use of echo.

list files recursively by size

history autocompletion with arrow keys
This will enable the possibility to navigate in the history of the command you type with the arrow keys, example "na" and the arrow will give all command starting by na in the history.You can add these lines to your .bashrc (without &&) to use that in your default terminal.


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