Commands by ppaschka (5)

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Create a listing of all possible permissions and their octal representation.

Show the last 20 sessions logged on the machine
change 20 by the number of sessions you want to know (20 it's fair enough)

backup and synchronize entire remote folder locally (curlftpfs and rsync over FTP using FUSE FS)
connect to a remote server using ftp protocol over FUSE file system, then rsync the remote folder to a local one and then unmount the remote ftp server (FUSE FS) it can be divided to 3 different commands and you should have curlftpfs and rsync installed

Remote control for Rhythmbox on an Ubuntu Media PC
Note: you'll want to set up pub-key ssh auth. Gives you a quick means of changing volume/tracks/etc for rhythmbox on a remote machine. E.g.: rc --next # Play next track rc --print-playing # Grab the name rc --volume-down rc --help

pipe output of a command to your clipboard
In turn you can get the contents of your clipboard by typing xsel by itself with no arguments: $ xsel This command requires you to install the xsel utility which is free

Randomly run command
Randomly decide whether to run a command, or fail. It's useful for testing purposes. . Usage: ran PERCENTAGE COMMAND [ARGS] Note: In this version the percentage is required. . This is like @sesom42 and @snipertyler's commands but in a USABLE form. . e.g. In your complicated shell script, put "ran 99" before a crucial component. Now, it will fail 1% of the time allowing you to test the failure code-path. $ ran 99 my_complex_program arg1 arg2

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show your local ipv4 IP
To show ipv6 instead, use [[ -6 ]] instead of [[ -4 ]] $ip -o -6 a s | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}' To show only the IP of a specific interface, in case you get more than one result: $ip -o -4 a s eth0 | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}' $ip -o -4 a s wlan0 | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}'

Sort all running processes by their memory & CPU usage
you can also pipe it to "tail" command to show 10 most memory using processes.

Another Matrix Style Implementation


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