Commands by ptotaram (1)

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Find files that are older than x days
Find files that are older than x days in the working directory and list them. This will recurse all the sub-directories inside the working directory. By changing the value for -mtime, you can adjust the time and by replacing the ls command with, say, rm, you can remove those files if you wish to.

Find all files under a certain directory /home that have a certain suffix at the end of the file name. Show the file and rename them to remove the suffix.

Copy input sent to a command to stderr
In the above example 'muspi merol' (the output of the first rev command) is sent to stderr and 'lorem ipsum' (the output of the second rev command) is sent to stdout. rev reverse lines of a file or files. This use of tee allows testing if a program correctly handles its input without using files that hold the data.

Fetch the Gateway Ip Address
Better use iproute2 !

Show complete URL in netstat output
The -W switch of netstat makes it print complete URL of the connections, which otherwise by default is truncated to fit its default column size. Now to compensate for irregular column sizes, pipe the output to column (-t switch of column prints in tabular form). The only downside to this part is that the very first row, the header, goes pear shape.

prints message in given argument on on center of screen
$ function echox { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines))) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2 ))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } echox prints given argument on bottom line center screen in terminal $ function echoxy { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)/2)) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } exhoxy prints given argument center screen $ function echos { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) $(($(tput cols)-$(echo ${#1})))&&tput sc`"$1"`tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) 0 && tput rc`; } $ while [ 1 ]; do echos "`date`"; done echos prints date and time on second from last line (used as status message) you can easily use these functions by placing them in your .bashrc file, make sure to source your .bashrc once you do

View Processeses like a fu, fu
I don't truly enjoy many commands more than this one, which I alias to be ps1.. Cool to be able to see the heirarchy and makes it clearer what need to be killed, and whats really going on.

Clean up display when the bash prompt is displayed
This will cause bash to fix a garbled terminal before the prompt is printed. For example, if you cat a file with nonprintable character sequences, the terminal sometimes ends up in a mode where it only prints line drawing characters. This sequence will return the terminal to the standard character set after every command.

list files recursively by size

Create a temporary file
To create directory, use: $ tempdir=$(/bin/mktemp -d)


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