Commands by purpleturtle (1)

  • Show disk space info, grepping out the uninteresting ones beginning with ^none while we're at it. The main point of this submission is the way it maintains the header row with the command grouping, by removing it from the pipeline before it gets fed into the sort command. (I'm surprised sort doesn't have an option to skip a header row, actually..) It took me a while to work out how to do this, I thought of it as I was drifting off to sleep last night! Show Sample Output


    2
    df -h | grep -v ^none | ( read header ; echo "$header" ; sort -rn -k 5)
    purpleturtle · 2011-03-16 14:25:45 1

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