Commands by ratberryjam (2)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Make any command read line enabled (on *nix)
Enable readline even if the command line application is not using it.

recursive base64 encoding -- Cipher for the Poor ?
Just for fun, I searched a simple way to encrypt some text. Simple base64 encoding seemed a good start so I decided to "amplify" encoding using repeted base64 encoding. Of course, this is not really secure but can be useful to hide datas to most part of humans ;). Do not hesitate to provide better solutions or else.

List the CPU model name
Information for only one core.

Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command
Next time you are using your shell, try typing $ ctrl-x ctrl-e # in emacs mode or $ v # in vi mode The shell will take what you've written on the command line thus far and paste it into the editor specified by $EDITOR. Then you can edit at leisure using all the powerful macros and commands of vi, emacs, nano, or whatever.

Get your outgoing IP address

grep across a git repo and open matching files in gedit

Generate Random Text based on Length

Open Sublime-text in current directory

AWK Calculator

Double your disk read performance in a single command
(WARN) This will absolutely not work on all systems, unless you're running large, high speed, hardware RAID arrays. For example, systems using Dell PERC 5/i SAS/SATA arrays. If you have a hardware RAID array, try it. It certainly wont hurt. You may be can test the speed disk with some large file in your system, before and after using this: $ time dd if=/tmp/disk.iso of=/dev/null bs=256k To know the value of block device parameter known as readahead. $ blockdev --getra /dev/sdb And set the a value 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, and maybe 16384... it really depends on the number of hard disks, their speed, your RAID controller, etc. (see sample)


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: