Commands by regnarg (1)

  • Use if you want to include untrusted literal strings in your grep regexes. I use it to list all mounts below a directory: dir=/mnt/gentoo; cat /proc/mounts |awk '{print $2}' |egrep "^$(egrep_escape "$dir")(/|$)" /mnt/gentoo /mnt/gentoo/proc /mnt/gentoo/sys /mnt/gentoo/dev /mnt/gentoo/home Works even if $dir contains dangerous characters (e.g. comes from a commandline argument). Show Sample Output


    0
    egrep_escape() { echo "$1" |sed -re 's/([\\.*+?(|)^$[])/\\\1/g' -e 's/\{/[{]/g'; }
    regnarg · 2012-08-02 16:54:43 0

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