Commands by remcintyre (0)

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remove *.jpg smaller than 500x500

Create a bunch of dummy text files

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

cloning partition tables under Solaris

Monitor TCP opened connections

Use jq to validate and pretty-print json output
The `jq` tool can also be used do validate json files and pretty print output: ` jq < file.json` Available on several platforms, including newer debian-based systems via `#sudo apt install jq`, mac via `brew install jq`, and from source https://stedolan.github.io/jq/download/ This alternative to the original avoids the useless use of cat

grab all commandlinefu shell functions into a single file, suitable for sourcing.
Each shell function has its own summary line, as a comment. If there are multiple shell functions with the same name, the function with the highest number of votes is put into the file. Note: added 'grep -v' to the end of the pipeline, to eliminate extraneous lines containing only '--'. Thanks to matthewbauer for pointing this out.

matrix in your term
-a : Asynchronous scroll -b : Bold characters on -x : X window mode, use if your xterm is using mtx.pcf

List all TCP opened ports on localhost in LISTEN mode
Alternative of OJM snippet : This one show the IP too, where ports bind. It's very important, because if there's only 127.0.0.1 instead of 0.0.0.0, connections from internet are rejected.

Migrate Server with rsync
Copies the complete root-dir of a linux server to another one, where the new harddisks formated and mountet. Very useful to migrate a root-server to another one.


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