Commands by renich (10)

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see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network
see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network

Find which service was used by which port number

How to trim a video using ffmpeg
Will trim the video to 4 seconds starting from the beginning. The -vcodec , -acodec options are required so that ffmpeg knows in what video/audio format you want for the new video.

FLV to AVI with subtitles and forcing audio sync using mencoder
Gives MPEG-4/DivX output video file ready for uploading to YouTube from FLV file downloaded from the site and your own subtitle file UTF-8 encoded. No resizing needed. (?)

Show account security settings
Show account security settings

Command line calculator
This opens a python command line. You can use math and random and float-division is enabled (without appending .0 to integers). I just don't know how to specify a standard precision.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

List open files that have no links to them on the filesystem
I have come across a situation in the past where someone has unlinked a file by running an 'rm' command against it while it was still being written to by a running process. The problem manifested itself when a 'df' command showed a filesystem at 100%, but this did not match the total value of a 'du -sk *'. When this happens, the process continues to write to the file but you can no longer see the file on the filesystem. Stopping and starting the process will, more often than not, get rid of the unlinked file, however this is not always possible on a live server. When you are in this situation you can use the 'lsof' command above to get the PID of the process that owns the file (in the sample output this is 23521). Run the following command to see a sym-link to the file (marked as deleted): $ cd /proc/23521/fd && ls -l Truncate the sym-link to regain your disk space: $ > /proc/23521/fd/3 I should point out that this is pretty brutal and *could* potentially destabilise your system depending on what process the file belongs to that you are truncating.

Create a self-signed certificate for Apache Tomcat
Must be run as root. The 'tomcat' user must have access to the .keystore file. The key and keystore passwords must be the same. The password must be entered into the server.xml config file for Tomcat.

list files recursively by size


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