Commands by retrodanny (6)

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Connect-back shell using Bash built-ins
Connect-back shell using Bash built-ins. Useful in a web app penetration test, if it's the case of a locked down environment, without the need for file uploads or a writable directory. -- /dev/tcp and /dev/udb redirects must be enabled at compile time in Bash. Most Linux distros enable this feature by default but at least Debian is known to disable it. -- http://labs.neohapsis.com/2008/04/17/connect-back-shell-literally/

list files recursively by size

identify exported sonames in a path
This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be $ scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation.

Run bash on top of a vi session (saved or not saved), run multiple commands, instead of one at a time with :!(bashcommand), type exit and [enter] to get back to where you left off in vi.
Helps when I'm editing a script and want to double check some commands without having to exit out of vi multiple times or having to use another terminal session.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show apps that use internet connection at the moment. (Multi-Language)

Burn an ISO on the command line.

Print github url for the current url
Works for repos cloned via ssh or https.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

most used unix commands


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