Commands by rgiar (1)

  • this shows the CWD of every running `java' command. YMMV but we often switch to a working directory for each service to start and run from there -- therefore this quicly shows what is running by a more meaningful name than command alone (the -bw prevents using blocking system calls which speeds this up quite a bit in the presence of remote mounted filesystems)


    2
    lsof -bw -d cwd -a -c java
    rgiar · 2011-06-09 01:45:26 1

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