Commands by rgiar (1)

  • this shows the CWD of every running `java' command. YMMV but we often switch to a working directory for each service to start and run from there -- therefore this quicly shows what is running by a more meaningful name than command alone (the -bw prevents using blocking system calls which speeds this up quite a bit in the presence of remote mounted filesystems)


    2
    lsof -bw -d cwd -a -c java
    rgiar · 2011-06-09 01:45:26 1

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

print date 24 hours ago

List only hidden files
You can omit the -d to see what's inside directories. In that case, you may want -a to see dotfiles inside those directories. (Otherwise you don't need -a since you're explicitly looking at them.)

Remove a range of lines from a file

Convert JSON to YAML
Requires installing json2yaml via npm: npm install -g json2yaml (can also pipe from stdin) Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/json2yaml

Print your cpu intel architecture family

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

grep apache access.log and list IP's by hits and date - sorted

Remove text from file1 which is in file2 and stores it in an other file
This command compares file2 with file1 and removes the lines that are in file1 from file2. Handy if you have a file where file1 was the origional and you want to remove the origional data from your file2.

Convert (almost) any video file into webm format for online html5 streaming

check open ports without netstat or lsof


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: