Commands by ricardoarguello (4)

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Touch a file using a timestamp embedded in the file name.
tstouch takes two arguments: a filename containing a timestamp, and an extended regular expression with the parenthesized section matching a timestamp of the form YYYYMMDDhhmm or YYYYMMDDhhmm.ss. It then touches the file with that timestamp.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

batch convert Nikon RAW (nef) images to JPG
converts RAW files from a Nikon DSLR to jpg for easy viewing etc. requires ufraw package

Output the content of your Active Directory in a CSV file

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

google tts

Recursive chmod all files and directories within the current directory

I finally found out how to use notify-send with at or cron
The simplest way to do it. Works for me, at least. (Why are the variables being set?)

Split a large file, without wasting disk space
It's common to want to split up large files and the usual method is to use split(1). If you have a 10GiB file, you'll need 10GiB of free space. Then the OS has to read 10GiB and write 10GiB (usually on the same filesystem). This takes AGES. . The command uses a set of loop block devices to create fake chunks, but without making any changes to the file. This means the file splitting is nearly instantaneous. The example creates a 1GiB file, then splits it into 16 x 64MiB chunks (/dev/loop0 .. loop15). . Note: This isn't a drop-in replacement for using split. The results are block devices. tar and zip won't do what you expect when given block devices. . These commands will work: $ hexdump /dev/loop4 . $ gzip -9 < /dev/loop6 > part6.gz . $ cat /dev/loop10 > /media/usb/part10.bin

Email a file to yourself
This uses mutt to send the file, and doesn't require uuencode etc


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