Commands by ricardofunke (4)

  • Monitoring TCP connections number showing each state. It uses ss instead of netstat because it's much faster with high trafic. You can fgrep specific ports by piping right before awk: watch "ss -nat | fgrep :80 | awk '"'{print $1}'"' | sort | uniq -c" Show Sample Output


    -1
    watch "ss -nat | awk '"'{print $1}'"' | sort | uniq -c"
    ricardofunke · 2012-12-07 19:07:33 2
  • This command disable sending of start/stop characters. It's useful when you want to use incremental reverse history search forward shortcut (Ctrl+s). To enable again, type: stty -ixoff


    1
    stty -ixon
    ricardofunke · 2012-05-28 19:04:19 0
  • This command shows the various shortcuts that can be use in bash, including Ctrl+L, Ctrl+R, etc... You can translate "\C-y" to Ctrl+y, for example. Show Sample Output


    40
    bind -P
    ricardofunke · 2012-05-28 18:51:59 3
  • This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived. It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need. To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files. Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.


    2
    find . -iname '*.zip' | while read file; do unzip -l "$file" | grep -q [internal file name] && echo $file; done
    ricardofunke · 2012-03-23 18:08:35 5

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