Commands by ricardofunke (5)

  • Use this command if you want to rename all subtitles for them to have the same name as the mp4 files. NOTE: The order of "ls -1 *.mp4" must match the order of "ls -1 *.srt", run the command bellow to make sure the *.srt files will really match the movies after run this command: paste -d:


    0
    paste -d: <(ls -1 *.mp4) <(ls -1 *.srt) | while read line; do movie="${line%%:*}"; subtitle="${line##*:}"; mv "${subtitle}" "${movie%.*}.srt"; done
    ricardofunke · 2020-11-08 02:47:13 22
  • Monitoring TCP connections number showing each state. It uses ss instead of netstat because it's much faster with high trafic. You can fgrep specific ports by piping right before awk: watch "ss -nat | fgrep :80 | awk '"'{print $1}'"' | sort | uniq -c" Show Sample Output


    -1
    watch "ss -nat | awk '"'{print $1}'"' | sort | uniq -c"
    ricardofunke · 2012-12-07 19:07:33 2
  • This command disable sending of start/stop characters. It's useful when you want to use incremental reverse history search forward shortcut (Ctrl+s). To enable again, type: stty -ixoff


    1
    stty -ixon
    ricardofunke · 2012-05-28 19:04:19 0
  • This command shows the various shortcuts that can be use in bash, including Ctrl+L, Ctrl+R, etc... You can translate "\C-y" to Ctrl+y, for example. Show Sample Output


    41
    bind -P
    ricardofunke · 2012-05-28 18:51:59 3
  • This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived. It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need. To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files. Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.


    2
    find . -iname '*.zip' | while read file; do unzip -l "$file" | grep -q [internal file name] && echo $file; done
    ricardofunke · 2012-03-23 18:08:35 5

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
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Show an application's environment variables

Get all IPs via ifconfig

Displays the current time using HTTP
This command will show the current GMT time using HTTP. This might be useful if you just want to know what's the current human-readable and accurate-enough time, without changing the system time, using a simple command that would work regardless of the availability of NTP. Note: To get a quicker and more accurate response, replace google.com with your local NTP server. Also can be used as an alternative to the "htpdate" program: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/668/set-your-computers-clock-using-http-and-htp-http-time-protocol-when-ntpsntp-is-not-available

Provide the ten largest subfolders in the current folder

Lookup errno defintions
Calls the POSIX strerror() function to look up the meaning of integer ERRNOs set by some functions.

exec chmod to subfiles
Using `-exec cmd {} +` causes find to build the command using all matching filenames before execution, rather than once per file.

Pipe STDOUT to vim
The hyphen tells vim to open from STDOUT - saves having to create temporary files.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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