Commands by romulusnr (6)

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Copy recursivelly files of specific filetypes
Copying only wmv and mpg files recursively from to

Changing the terminal title to the last shell command
You can set the previous bash command as the terminal title by this command. Explanation: -trap assigns a command to execute at a given bash signal. -in the $BASH_COMMAND you find the last command -you can set the terminal title with the escape sequence: \e]0;this is the title\007 -to let the echo care about the backslashes give the -e to it Since trap is a built in bash command you find more informatin in 'man bash'for more Source: http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html

Purge configuration files of removed packages on debian based systems
also search with aptitude search '~c'

rename files according to date created
The command renames all files in a certain directory. Renaming them to their date of creation using EXIF. If you're working with JPG that contains EXIF data (ie. from digital camera), then you can use following to get the creation date instead of stat. * Since not every file has exif data, we want to check that dst is valid before doing the rest of commands. * The output from exif has a space, which is a PITA for filenames. Use sed to replace with '-'. * Note that I use 'echo' before the mv to test out my scripts. When you're confident that it's doing the right thing, then you can remove the 'echo'... you don't want to end up like the guy that got all the files blown away. Credits: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4710753/rename-files-according-to-date-created

Group OR'd commands where you expect only one to work
Something to stuff in an alias when you are working in multiple environments. The double-pipe OR will fall through until one of the commands succeeds, and the rest won't be executed. Any STDERR will fall out, but the STDOUT from the correct command will bubble out of the parenthesis to the less command, or some other command you specify.

alias to close terminal with :q
Put this in your ~/.bashrc file (or the equivalent) If you use vim a lot, this alias will be immediately obvious. Your brain will thank you.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Execute a command with a timeout
A timeout is great, but what if the command is taking longer than expected because it's hung up or ran into some other problem? That's where the -k option comes in. Run "some_command" and timeout after 30s. If the command is still running after 1 minute, it will receive a kill signal.


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