Commands by romulusnr (6)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

To get internet connection information .
To get the connection information of protocol tcp and extended infortmation.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Install Linux Kernel Headers

Display all readline binding that use CTRL
Useful for getting to know the available keyboard shortcuts.

watch your network load on specific network interface
-n means refresh frequency you could change eth0 to any interface you want, like wlan0

list files recursively by size

convert unixtime to human-readable with awk
- convert unixtime to human-readable with awk - useful to read logfiles with unix-timestamps, f.e. squid-log: sudo tail -f /var/log/squid3/access.log | awk '{ print strftime("%c ", $1) $0; }

grep (or anything else) many files with multiprocessor power
Parallel does not suffer from the risk of mixing of output that xargs suffers from. -j+0 will run as many jobs in parallel as you have cores. With parallel you only need -0 (and -print0) if your filenames contain a '\n'. Parallel is from https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/

Display kernel profile of currently executing functions in Solaris.
Lockstat will sample the kernel 977 times per second, and print out the functions that it sees executing on the CPU during the sample. The -s 10 switch tells lockstsat to not only print that function, but also show the call stack (up to 10 deep).


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: