Commands by roolebo (1)

  • Trace python statement execution and syscalls invoked during that simultaneously Show Sample Output


    0
    strace python -m trace --trace myprog.py | grep -v 'write(1,'
    roolebo · 2016-05-27 21:01:01 3

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