Commands by ruwindada (0)

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Sort file greater than a specified size in human readeable format including their path and typed by color, running from current directory
1. find file greater than 10 MB 2. direct it to xargs 3. xargs pass them as argument to ls

Make a statistic about the lines of code
use find to grep all .c files from the target directory, cat them into one stream, then piped to wc to count the lines

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Create a file of repeated, non-zero
dd can be used with /dev/zero to easily create a file of all zero-bytes. Pipe that through tr and use octal conversions to change the byte values from zero to 0xff (octal 0377). You can replace 0377 with the byte of your choice. You can also use \\0 and \\377 instead of the quoted version.

Redirect tar extract to another directory
The command extracting the tar contents into particular directory ...

list all files in a directory, sorted in reverse order by modification time, use file descriptors.
It's both silly, and infinitely useful. Especially useful in logfile directories where you want to know what file is being updated while troubleshooting.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

rsync over ssh using alternative port number
Useful, when you need to backup/copy/sync a folder over ssh with a non standard port number

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Print a cron formatted time for 2 minutes in the future (for crontab testing)
Another function to stick into your .bashrc This spits out the time two minutes in the future, but already formatted for pasting into your crontab file for testing without any thought required on your part. Frequently things don't work the way you expect inside a crontab job, and you probably want to find out now that your $PATH is completely different inside of cron or other global variables aren't defined. So this will generate a date you can use for testing now, and then later you can change it to run at 5:37 am on a Sunday evening.


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