Commands by rwky (1)

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split a file by a specific number of lines
Splits the file "my_file" every 500 lines. Will create files called xx01 xx02 and so on. You can change the prefix by using the -f option. Comes in handy for splitting logfiles for example. I am using it for feeding a logfile parser with smaller files instead of one big file (due to performance reasons)

Slow down IO heavy process
Some IO intensive process make the system unresponsive. This function periodically starts/stops a process, which hopefully releases some resources for other activities. This function is useful when ionice is not available

Create new user with home dir and given password
The crypt function takes a password, key, as a string, and a salt character array which is described below, and returns a printable ASCII string which starts with another salt. It is believed that, given the output of the function, the best way to find a key that will produce that output is to guess values of key until the original value of key is found. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crypt_(Unix)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Auto download Ubuntu 10.04 LTS with super fast zsync
Need to have rc iso pre-downloaded before running command.

concatenate compressed and uncompressed logs
I use zgrep because it also parses non gzip files. With ls -tr, we parse logs in time order. Greping the empty string just concatenates all logs, but you can also grep an IP, an URL...

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Found how how much memory in kB $PID is occupying in Linux
The "proportional set size" is probably the closest representation of how much active memory a process is using in the Linux virtual memory stack. This number should also closely represent the %mem found in ps(1), htop(1), and other utilities.

git pull all repos

Adequately order the page numbers to print a booklet
Useful if you don't have at hand the ability to automatically create a booklet, but still want to. F is the number of pages to print. It *must* be a multiple of 4; append extra blank pages if needed. In evince, these are the steps to print it, adapted from https://help.gnome.org/users/evince/stable/duplex-npage.html.en : 1) Click File ▸ Print. 2) Choose the General tab. Under Range, choose Pages. Type the numbers of the pages in this order (this is what this one-liner does for you): n, 1, 2, n-1, n-2, 3, 4, n-3, n-4, 5, 6, n-5, n-6, 7, 8, n-7, n-8, 9, 10, n-9, n-10, 11, 12, n-11... ...until you have typed n-number of pages. 3) Choose the Page Setup tab. - Assuming a duplex printer: Under Layout, in the Two-side menu, select Short Edge (Flip). - If you can only print on one side, you have to print twice, one for the odd pages and one for the even pages. In the Pages per side option, select 2. In the Page ordering menu, select Left to right. 4) Click Print.


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