Commands by s333 (1)

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Less a grep result, going directly to the first match in the first file
Really useful way to combine less and grep while browsing log files. I can't figure out how to make it into a true oneliner so paste it into a script file called lgrep: Usage: lgrep searchfor file1 [file2 file3] Advanced example (grep for an Exception in logfiles that starts with qc): lgrep Exception $(find . -name "qc*.log")

Speed up builds and scripts, remove duplicate entries in $PATH. Users scripts are oftern bad: PATH=/apath:$PATH type of thing cause diplicate.
Thanks to the authors of: $ awk '!x[$0]++' and the author of: $ joinargs() { (local IFS="$1"; shift && echo "$*") } and others, we can have a fast Linux or android. IMPORTANT if you find a priority order problem in PATH you can push a path directory to the front without duplication as follows: $ PATH=/bin:$PATH then ... Check duplication with: $ echo $PATH|tr : '\n'|sort|uniq -d Finally do a very neat line by line list of $PATH: $ echo "${PATH//:/$'\n'} The speed up is very noticeable for android, and builds on Linux Ubantu are much faster with make and scripts. I will update the command on request. Timothy from SONY

Rename all files which contain the sub-string 'foo', replacing it with 'bar'
Would this command line achieve the desired function? My CLI knowledge is not great so this could certainly be wrong. It is merely a suggestion for more experienced uses to critique. Best wishes roly :-)

List all symbolic links in current directory
Many competing commands to do this, but since most people want a Long list with Human readable files sizes and want to see All files (including hidden (.*) files) this one wins on simplicity and usefulness. Plus grep is just as, if not more portable than sed or awk, and is more widely understood. :)

Email a file to yourself
This uses mutt to send the file, and doesn't require uuencode etc

bypass any aliases and functions for the command
A simple directive which disables all aliases and functions for the command immediately following it. Shortcut for the bash built-in 'command' - "command linefoo". Think, {sic}...

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

List docker volumes by container

Add existing user to a group

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)


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