Commands by sagittarian (1)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

put command in a loop to keep trying a connection
This will keep trying to reconnect your netcat connection can be used with SSH or Telnet, just substitute nc for ssh or telnet very useful for troubleshooting VPNs were you want to send continuous packets towards a destination to trace.

Rename files in batch

List pr. command in megabytes sum of deleted files that are still in use and therefore consumes diskspace

To find which host made maximum number of specific tcp connections
This command is primarily going to work on linux boxes. and needs to be changed, for example IP=10\.194\.194\.2 PORT=389

Lock your KDE4 remotely (via regular KDE lock)
Forgot to lock your computer? Want to lock it via SSH or mobile phone or use it for scheduled lock? TIP: Make a alias for this (e. g. as "lock"). I found some howtos for ugly X11 lock, but this will use regular KDE locking utility. Note that KDE 3 is using utility with another name (I guess with the same argument --forcelock) Tested on Kubuntu 8.10. Stay tuned for remote unlock.

One command line web server on port 80 using nc (netcat)
Very simple web server listening on port 80 will serve index.html file or whatever file you like pointing your browser at http://your-IP-address/index.html for example. If your web server is down for maintenance and you'd like to inform your visitors about it, quickly and easily, you just have to put into the index.html file the right HTML code and you are done! Of course you need to be root to run the command using port 80.

Figure out your work output for the day
Figures out what has changed in the last 12 hours. Change the author to yourself, change the time since to whatever you want.

Kill any lingering ssh processes
Also ignoring "sshd" server is necessary since you should not kill ssh server processes.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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