Commands by sangnoir (1)

  • My script lists all users & the number of commits they made in the period, sorted alphabetically. To sort by number of commits, append a '|sort' to the end of the command. The script depends on the output format of svn log - original command didn't work for me because the string 'user' was not appearing in my output


    0
    svn log -r{2011-08-01}:HEAD|awk '$14 ~/line/ {print $3}'|sort|uniq -c
    sangnoir · 2011-09-01 07:58:54 0

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