Commands by sara (0)

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Changing the terminal title to the last shell command
Found the same command for zsh in http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html - changed it a bit so that the behaviour is the same

Generate random valid mac addresses
Python Alternative

Open Port Check
also could specify port number: lsof -ni TCP:80

View acceptable client certificate CA names asked for during SSL renegotiations
The key is to use the -prexit option at the command line, and then type "quit" instead of CTRL-C to exit OpenSSL. OpenSSL will then dump its last negotiated state, printing out the contents of the renegotiated handshake. Crucial for debugging client certificate configurations on web servers such as IIS, which renegotiate the SSL/TLS connection with the HTTP request in-flight to ask the client for a cert.

Let your computer lull you to sleep
Can change language and speed, see espeak man page for options. (Install espeak in your linux distro via yum or apt-get) For insomniacs you may need to enclose in a while true; do ...; done loop ;)

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Merge various PDF files

Get listening ports on a localhost
ss is a tool that will help you to get all kinds of useful information about the current sockets on a localhost. You can also get the uid of the daemons process using the flag: $ ss -le

See all the commits for which searchstring appear in the git diff

how to export a table in .csv file
Exports the result of query in a csv file


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