Commands by seungwon (6)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Hiding and Show files on Mac OS X
These commands will mark a file as hidden or visible to Mac OS X Finder. Notice the capitol V vs the lowercase v. This will also work for directories. setfile -a V foo.bar; // This marks the file invisible setfile -a v foo.bar; // This marks the file visible I have also found that adding the following aliases are helpful: alias hide='setfile -a V' alias show='setfile -a v'

Shows space used by each directory of the root filesystem excluding mountpoints/external filesystems (and sort the output)
Excludes other mountpoints with acavagni's "mountpoint" idea, but with -exec instead of piping to an xargs subshell. Then, calling "du" only once with -exec's "+" option. The first "\! -exec" acts as a test so only those who match are passed to the second "-exec" for du.

Filter out all blank or commented (starting with #) lines

Rename all .jpeg and .JPG files to .jpg

Share your terminal session real-time
One person does `mkfifo foo; script -f foo' and another can supervise real-time what is being done using `cat foo'.

Fix subtitle timing (for .sub files)
Fix a microdvd (.sub) subtitle timing by making the phrases to appear 600 frames earlier.

Show a prettified list of nearby wireless APs

grep for minus (-) sign
Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing

Run a command that has been aliased without the alias
Most distributions alias cp to 'cp -i', which means when you attempt to copy into a directory that already contains the file, cp will prompt to overwrite. A great default to have, but when you mean to overwrite thousands of files, you don't want to sit there hitting [y] then [enter] thousands of times. Enter the backslash. It runs the command unaliased, so as in the example, cp will happily overwrite existing files much in the way mv works.

Remove BOM (Byte Order Mark) from text file
Takes file (text.txt), removes BOM from it, and outputs the result to a new file (newFile.txt). BOM is "Byte Order Mark" ([http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark]), an invisible, non-breaking, zero-length character. In other words, if you see a DIFF with "" at the beginning, you've got a byte order mark, which can't be removed without this command or a hex editor. It can appear for a number of reasons, such as getting copied to/from a UNIX filesystem...


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: