Commands by sexyrms (1)

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Test load balancers
With the "--resolve" switch, you can avoid doing DNS lookups or edit the /etc/hosts file, by providing the IP address for a domain directly. Useful if you have many servers with different IP addresses behind a load balancer. Of course, you would loop it: $ for IP in 10.11.0.{1..10}; do curl --resolve subdomain.example.com:80:$IP subdomain.example.com -I -s; done

Rename files in batch

Fix time-stamped filenames of JPEG images according to the EXIF date the photo was taken
For each *.jpg or *.JPG file in the current directory, extract the date the photo was taken from its EXIF metadata. Then replace the date stamp, which is assumed to exist in the filename, by the date the photo was taken. A trick from https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/9256 is used to split the date into its components.

Listen Digitally Imported Radio from CLI (without premium!)
This commands does just two things: fakes user agent (the one was taken from recent Android app) and sends the (possibly) listener ID (it can be any - I put "1" here because it works like a charm - after the name of stream ?1 as you can see). Look for the list of stations here: http://pub7.di.fm Or here: https://goo.gl/pdhhpQ Best regards, sxiii :)

Unbelievable Shell Colors, Shading, Backgrounds, Effects for Non-X
I've been using linux for almost a decade and only recently discovered that most terminals like putty, xterm, xfree86, vt100, etc., support hundreds of shades of colors, backgrounds and text/terminal effects. This simply prints out a ton of them, the output is pretty amazing. If you use non-x terminals all the time like I do, it can really be helpful to know how to tweak colors and terminal capabilities. Like: $ echo $'\33[H\33[2J'

Copy your ssh public key to a server from a machine that doesn't have ssh-copy-id
This one is a bit more robust -- the remote machine may not have an .ssh directory, and it may not have an authorized_keys file, but if it does already, and you want to replace your ssh public key for some reason, this will work in that case as well, without duplicating the entry.

Twitter update from terminal (pok3's snipts ?)
Found it on snipt, pok3, is it yours? I put my user = m33600, the password and the status was my robot message: Settima robot message: ALARM ZONE 3 (sent via command line). Now bots may have their identity on twitter...

print a cpu of a process

Print diagram of user/groups
Parses /etc/group to "dot" format and pases it to "display" (imagemagick) to show a usefull diagram of users and groups (don't show empty groups).

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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