Commands by sfyn (1)

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Capture screen and mic input using FFmpeg and ALSA
Yet another x11grab using ffmpeg. I also added mic input to the capturing video stream using alsa. Yet I need to find out how to capture audio which is currently playing.

View dmesg output in human readable format

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

get bofh excuse from a trusted source :-)

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find ulimit values of currently running process
When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while $ ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: $ ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process.

Perl One Liner to Generate a Random IP Address
A bash version.

Override and update your locally modified files through cvs..

Create a new file

Dump a web page
Useful to browse dangerous web sites.


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