Commands by shadyabhi (3)

  • List SAN Domains for a certificate Show Sample Output


    0
    echo | openssl s_client -connect google.com:443 2>&1 | openssl x509 -noout -text | awk -F, -v OFS="\n" '/DNS:/{x=gsub(/ *DNS:/, ""); $1=$1; print $0}'
    shadyabhi · 2020-04-10 06:56:51 5
  • Blinks LED of a NIC card. Its used when you have multiple NICs and you want to identify the physical port of a particular ethernet card.


    15
    ethtool -p eth0
    shadyabhi · 2010-10-28 16:07:18 2
  • Just add this to your .bashrc file. Use quotes when query has multiple word length. Show Sample Output


    2
    findlocation() { place=`echo $1 | sed 's/ /%20/g'` ; curl -s "http://maps.google.com/maps/geo?output=json&oe=utf-8&q=$place" | grep -e "address" -e "coordinates" | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/"//g' -e 's/address/Full Address/';}
    shadyabhi · 2010-10-18 21:11:42 2

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Pretty Print a simple csv in the command line
Will handle pretty much all types of CSV Files. The ^M character is typed on the command line using Ctrl-V Ctrl-M and can be replaced with any character that does not appear inside the CSV. Tips for simpler CSV files: * If newlines are not placed within a csv cell then you can replace `map(repr, r)` with r

Customer Friendly free
makes more sense to customers XD

Close specify detached screen
-X Send the specified command to a running screen session. -S Option to specify the screen session if you have several screen sessions running. $screen -ls for listing current screens and its sessionname

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Getting started with tcpdump
At some point you want to know what packets are flowing on your network. Use tcpdump for this. The man page is obtuse, to say the least, so here are some simple commands to get you started. -n means show IP numbers and don't try to translate them to names. -l means write a line as soon as it is ready. -i eth0 means trace the packets flowing through the first ethernet interface. src or dst w.x.y.z traces only packets going to or from IP address w.x.y.z. port 80 traces only packets for HTTP. proto udp traces only packets for UDP protocol. Once you are happy with each option combine them with 'and' 'or' 'not' to get the effects you want.

Get information about memory modules
To take information about the characteristics of the installed memory modules.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Find broken symlinks and delete them

For when GUI programs stop responding..
man xkill

Change permissions of every directory in current directory
"find . -type d -print0 | xargs -0 chmod 755" thanks masterofdisaster


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