Commands by shadycraig (5)

  • This command can be used to revert a particular changeset in the local copy. I find this useful because I frequently import files into the wrong directory. After the import it says "Committed revision 123" or similar. to revert this change in the working copy do: svn merge -c -123 . (don't forget the .) and then commit. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn merge -c -REV
    shadycraig · 2010-06-21 15:11:13 0
  • This command shows the size of directories below here, refreshing every 2s. It will also track directories created after running the command (that what the find bit does). Show Sample Output


    0
    watch 'find -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -type d |xargs du -csh'
    shadycraig · 2010-05-19 13:13:57 4
  • Useful for C projects where header file names must be unique (e.g. when using autoconf/automake), or when diagnosing if the wrong header file is being used (due to dupe file names) Show Sample Output


    0
    find . -type f |sed "s#.*/##g" |sort |uniq -c -d
    shadycraig · 2010-02-17 11:59:54 2
  • Prompts the user for username and password, that are then exported to http_proxy for use by wget, yum etc Default user, webproxy and port are used. Using this script prevent the cleartext user and pass being in your bash_history and on-screen Show Sample Output


    1
    set-proxy () { P=webproxy:1234; DU="fred"; read -p "username[$DU]:" USER; printf "%b"; UN=${USER:-$DU}; read -s -p "password:" PASS; printf "%b" "\n"; export http_proxy="http://${UN}:${PASS}@$P/"; export ftp_proxy="http://${UN}:${PASS}@$P/"; }
    shadycraig · 2010-02-04 13:12:59 2
  • Works recusivley in the specified dir or '.' if none given. Repeatedly calls 'find' to find a newer file, when no newer files exist you have the newest. In this case 'newest' means most recently modified. To find the most recently created change -newer to -cnewer. Show Sample Output


    1
    newest () { DIR=${1:-'.'}; CANDIDATE=`find $DIR -type f|head -n1`; while [[ ! -z $CANDIDATE ]]; do BEST=$CANDIDATE; CANDIDATE=`find $DIR -newer "$BEST" -type f|head -n1`; done; echo "$BEST"; }
    shadycraig · 2010-02-04 12:40:44 2

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Print a row of characters across the terminal
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Print a row of characters across the terminal
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Invert selection with find.


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