Commands by shanti (1)

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Vectorize xkcd strips
Uses ImageMagick and potrace to vectorize the input image, with parameters optimized for xkcd-like pictures.

Blue Matrix
Same as original, but works in bash

Bash autocomplete case insensitive search
Change bash autocomplete case search to insensitive when pressing tab for completion.

Recursively remove all empty directories

list files recursively by size

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Sending a file over icmp with hping
you need to start a listening hping on the reciever: hping3 --listen 10.0.2.254 -I eth0 --sign MSGID1 then you can send your file: hping3 10.0.2.254 --icmp --sign MSGID1 -d 50 -c 1 --file a_file

Resize an image to at least a specific resolution
This command will resize an image (keeping the aspect ratio) to a specific resolution, meaning the resulting image will never be smaller than this resolution. For example, if we have a 2048x1000 image, the output would be 1229x600, not 1024x600 or 1024x500. Same thing for the height, if the image is 2000x1200, the output would be 1024x614.

Run a script in parrallel over ssh
Runs a local script over ssh assuming ssh keys are in place. -P argument prints results to stdout. # Uses - https://code.google.com/p/parallel-ssh/

Print all 256 colors for testing TERM or for a quick reference
This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output. $ tset xterm-256color at any rate that is some super lean code! Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile aa_256 () { ( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`; for i in {0..256}; do o=00$i; echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x; done ) } From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html


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