Commands by shopeonarope (1)

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Find all the links to a file
This command finds and prints all the symbolic and hard links to a file. Note that the file argument itself be a link and it will find the original file as well. You can also do this with the inode number for a file or directory by first using stat or ls or some other tool to get the number like so: $ stat -Lc %i file or $ ls -Hid file And then using: $ find -L / -inum INODE_NUMBER -exec ls -ld {} +

quick copy
Utilizes shell expansion of {} to give the original filename and a new filename as arguments to `cp`. Can easily be extended to make multiple copies.

List upcoming events on google calendar
Requires googlecl (http://code.google.com/p/googlecl/) Even better when you wrap this in a script and allow the --date=STRING to be $1. Then you can type: whatson "next Thursday" The date string for UNIX date is very flexible. You can also add --cal "[regex]" to the end for multiple calendars.

bulk dl files based on a pattern
-O switch creates local filename same as remote curl [][] -o #1#2 makes local files unique inserting sequence values into #x placeholders sequences can be alpha or numeric e.g [a-z] [1-25]

Create a bunch of dummy text files
Avoiding a for loop brought this time down to less than 3 seconds on my old machine. And just to be clear, 33554432 = 8192 * 4086.

Print trending topics on Twitter

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

See how many % of your memory firefox is using

Gets the english pronunciation of a phrase
Sends a string to google tranlator, which converts it to English speech. It's possible to create a nice script to do the job for us, such as #!/bin'bash curl -A "Mozilla" "http://translate.google.com/translate_tts?tl=en&q=$1" > /tmp/speak.mp3 mplayer /tmp/speak.mp3

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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