Commands by siberian (0)

  • bash: commands not found

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Your name backwards

Get a funny one-liner from www.onelinerz.net
Put this command in .bashrc and every time you open a new terminal a random quote will be downloaded and printed from onelinerz.net. By altering the URL in the w3m statement you can change the output: 1 to 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/random-one-liners/(number)/ 20 newest lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/latest-one-liners/ Top 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/top-100-funny-one-liners/ Top 10 lines are updated daily.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Adding formatting to an xml document for easier reading
This will indent the input to be more readable. Warnings and messages are not send to STDOUT so you can just use a pipe to create the formatted outputfile, like: $ tidy -i -xml in.xml > out.xml

Unzip multi-part zip archive
Assuming you have a multi-part archive like "archive.zip archive.z01 archive.z02 ...", unzip will not handle these correctly. If you "fix" the parts into one big file with zip -F before, it works.

Print a row of 50 hyphens
essentially the ruby one, but perhaps has a larger installed base

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Archive a directory with datestamp on filename
A useful bash function: gztardir() { if [ $# -ne 1 ] ; then echo "incorrect arguments: should be gztardir " else tar zcvf "${1%/}-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M).tar.gz" "$1" fi }

Show a prettified list of nearby wireless APs

Fire CMD every time FILE (or directory) is updated (on *BSD)


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: