Commands by sil (8)

  • There's been a few times I've needed to create random numbers. Although I've done so in PERL, I've found Ruby is actually faster. This script generates 20 random "10" digit number NOT A RANDOM NUMBER. Replace 20 (1..20) with the amount of random numbers you need generated Show Sample Output


    3
    ruby -e "puts (1..20).map {rand(10 ** 10).to_s.rjust(10,'0')}"
    sil · 2009-05-27 19:52:53 3
  • self explanatory see sample output Show Sample Output


    -2
    perl -lpe'1 while s/^([-+]?\d+)(\d{3})/$1.$2/'
    sil · 2009-02-18 21:54:22 1
  • Alrighty, so I was really bored ;) Show Sample Output


    -5
    ''=~('(?{'.('_/@.*@'^'/])@^`').'"'.('"/_/@]/--!.:@</:[@(:/:^'^'[@*]`>@@@@@^`[@_(`@_]_|').',$/})')
    sil · 2009-02-18 17:22:26 1
  • Insert a comma where necessary when counting large numbers. I needed to separate huge amounts of packets and after 12+ hours of looking in a terminal, I wanted it in readable form. Show Sample Output


    2
    perl -pe '$_=reverse;s/\d{3}(?=\d)(?!.*?\.)/$&,/g;$_=reverse'
    sil · 2009-02-18 16:34:18 0
  • Blacklisted is a compiled list of all known dirty hosts (botnets, spammers, bruteforcers, etc.) which is updated on an hourly basis. This command will get the list and create the rules for you, if you want them automatically blocked, append |sh to the end of the command line. It's a more practical solution to block all and allow in specifics however, there are many who don't or can't do this which is where this script will come in handy. For those using ipfw, a quick fix would be {print "add deny ip from "$1" to any}. Posted in the sample output are the top two entries. Be advised the blacklisted file itself filters out RFC1918 addresses (10.x.x.x, 172.16-31.x.x, 192.168.x.x) however, it is advisable you check/parse the list before you implement the rules Show Sample Output


    32
    wget -qO - http://infiltrated.net/blacklisted|awk '!/#|[a-z]/&&/./{print "iptables -A INPUT -s "$1" -j DROP"}'
    sil · 2009-02-18 16:08:23 7
  • I've got this posted in one of my .bash_profiles for humor whenever I log in. Show Sample Output


    -2
    wget -qO - snubster.com|sed -n '65p'|awk 'gsub(/<span><br>.*/,"")&&1'|perl -p -e 's:myScroller1.addItem\("<span class=atHeaderOrange>::g;s:</span> <span class=snubFontSmall>::g;s:&quot;:":g;s:^:\n:g;s:$:\n:'
    sil · 2009-02-18 15:05:13 1
  • I sometimes have large files of MAC addresses stored in a file, some databases need the information stored with the semicolon (makes for easier programming a device) others don't. I have a barcode to text file scanner which usually butchers MAC addresses so this was the fix> I initially did this in awk ;) awk '{for(i=10;i>=2;i-=2)$0=substr($0,1,i)":"substr($0,i+1);print}' mac_address_list Show Sample Output


    6
    sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g;s/:$//' mac_address_list
    sil · 2009-02-18 14:38:37 0
  • This comes in handy if you have daemons/programs that have potential issues and stop/disappear, etc., can be run in cron to ensure that a program remains up no matter what. Be advised though, if a program did core out, you'd likely want to know why (gdb) so use with caution on production machines.


    3
    ps -C thisdaemon || { thisdaemon & }
    sil · 2009-02-18 14:12:17 0

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Comma insertions
Insert a comma where necessary when counting large numbers. I needed to separate huge amounts of packets and after 12+ hours of looking in a terminal, I wanted it in readable form.

Edit a google doc with vim
Google just released a new commend line tool offering all sorts of new services from the commend line. One of them is uploading a youtube video but there are plenty more google services to interact with. Download it here: http://code.google.com/p/googlecl/ Manual: http://code.google.com/p/googlecl/wiki/Manual This specific command courtesy of lifehacker:http://lifehacker.com/5568817/ Though all can be found in manual page linked above.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Be notified about overheating of your CPU and/or motherboard
You'll be notified if your core 1 temperature exceeds 50 degrees, you can change the monitored device by editing the "Core 1" or change the critical temperature by editing the "-gt 50" part. Note: you must have lm-sensors installed and configured in order to get this command working.

Print average GPU core temperature

Search commandlinefu and view syntax-highlighted results in vim
Here is the full function (got trunctated), which is much better and works for multiple queries. function cmdfu () { local t=~/cmdfu; until [[ -z $1 ]]; do echo -e "\n# $1 {{{1" >> $t; curl -s "commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$1/`echo -n $1|base64`/plaintext" | sed '1,2d;s/^#.*/& {{{2/g' | tee -a $t > $t.c; sed -i "s/^# $1 {/# $1 - `grep -c '^#' $t.c` {/" $t; shift; done; vim -u /dev/null -c "set ft=sh fdm=marker fdl=1 noswf" -M $t; rm $t $t.c } Searches commandlinefu for single/multiple queries and displays syntax-highlighted, folded, and numbered results in vim.


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