Commands by simonp (1)

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Recursively change permissions on files, leave directories alone.

Get a stream feed from a Twitter user
*** CAREFULLY READ THE NOTES **** *** THIS DOES NOT WORK "OUT OF THE BOX" *** You'll need a few minutes of CAREFUL reading before making your own Twitter feed: In 2010 simple command line Twitter feed requests all stopped working because Twitter upgraded to SSL security. Https requests for a filtered Twitter stream feed now require a special header called "oauth_header". The benefit is that your stream feed and login info is securely encrypted. The bad news is that an "oauth_header" takes some work to build. Fortunately, four functions, imaginatively named step1, step2, step3 and step4 can be used to build a customized oauth_header for you in a few minutes. Now, go look at "step1" to start creating your own oauth_header!

function to edit your history file
eh stands for Edit History . Frequently, I'll mistype a command, and then step back through my history and correct the command. As a result, both the correct and incorrect commands are in my history file. I wanted a simple way to remove the incorrect command so I don't run it by mistake. . When running this function, first the ~/bash_history file is updated, then you edit the file in vi, and then the saved history file is loaded back into memory for current usage. . while in vi, remember that `Shift-G` sends you to the bottom of the file, and `dd` removes a line. . this command is different than bash built-in `fc` because it does not run the command after editing.

play high-res video files on a slow processor
Certain codecs in high res don't play so well on my Dell Mini 9. Using this command, I can play just about anything and it keeps the sound in sync to boot!

Create a continuous digital clock in Linux terminal
Source: http://www.my-guides.net/en/guides/linux/364-how-to-create-a-continuous-digital-clock-in-linux-terminal

external projector for presentations
i spent way too many hours trying to fiddle with /etc/X11/xorg.conf trying to hook up various external projectors. too bad i didn't know this would solve all my problems.

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'

Mount file system using back-up superblock
Found on http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-find-alternative-superblocks/

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.


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