Commands by sixsicsix (0)

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Remove all leading and trailing spaces or tabs from all lines of a text file
Bash only, no sed, no awk. Multiple spaces/tabs if exists INSIDE the line will be preserved. Empty lines stay intact, except they will be cleaned from spaces and tabs if any available.

small CPU benchmark with PI, bc and time.
$ # 4 cores with 2500 pi digits $ CPUBENCH 4 2500 $. $ every core will use 100% cpu and you can see how fast they calculate it. $ if you do 50000 digitits and more it can take hours or days

Calculating series with awk: add numbers from 1 to 100
"seq 100" outputs 1,2,..,100, separated by newlines. awk adds them up and displays the sum. "seq 1 2 11" outputs 1,3,..,11. Variations: 1+3+...+(2n-1) = n^2 $ seq 1 2 19 | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum}' # displays 100 1/2 + 1/4 + ... = 1 $ seq 10 | awk '{sum+=1/(2**$1)} END {print sum}' # displays 0.999023

Create a script of the last executed command
Sometimes commands are long, but useful, so it's helpful to be able to make them permanent without having to retype them. An alternative could use the history command, and a cut/sed line that works on your platform. $history -1 | cut -c 7- > foo.sh

tail, with specific pattern colored

last.fm rss parser
Quick and kludgy rss parser for the recent tracks rss feed from last.fm. Extracts artist and track link.

Generate a list of installed packages on Debian-based systems

Find files that were modified by a given command
Traces the system calls of a program. See http://linuxhelp.blogspot.com/2006/05/strace-very-powerful-troubleshooting.html for more information.

My Git Tree Command!
this creates a tree of your branch merges. very useful if you want to follow the features you add.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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