Commands by skinp (0)

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Backup all MySQL Databases to individual files
Backs up all databases, excluding test, mysql, performance_schema, information_schema. Requires parallel to work, install parallel on Ubuntu by running: sudo aptitude install parallel

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Lists all listening ports together with the PID of the associated process
This command is more portable than it's cousin netstat. It works well on all the BSDs, GNU/Linux, AIX and Mac OS X. You won't find lsof by default on Solaris or HPUX by default, but packages exist around the web for installation, if needed, and the command works as shown. This is the most portable command I can find that lists listening ports and their associated pid.

small CPU benchmark with PI, bc and time.
$ # 4 cores with 2500 pi digits $ CPUBENCH 4 2500 $. $ every core will use 100% cpu and you can see how fast they calculate it. $ if you do 50000 digitits and more it can take hours or days

Print number of mb of free ram
This will show the amount of physical RAM that is left unused by the system.

List files with full path
This version is a bit more portable although it isn't extended as easily with '-type f' etc. On AIX the find command doesn't have -maxdepth or equivalent.

Doing some floating point calculations with rounding (e.g. at the 3rd decimal)

Quickly analyse an Apache error log
This searches the Apache error_log for each of the 5 most significant Apache error levels, if any are found the date is then cut from the output in order to sort then print the most common occurrence of each error.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find the package that installed a command


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