Commands by skygreg (7)

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Get the 10 biggest files/folders for the current direcotry

Wait for file to stop changing
Here's a way to wait for a file (a download, a logfile, etc) to stop changing, then do something. As written it will just return to the prompt, but you could add a "; echo DONE" or whatever at the end. This just compares the full output of "ls" every 10 seconds, and keeps going as long as that output has changed since the last interval. If the file is being appended to, the size will change, and if it's being modified without growing, the timestamp from the "--full-time" option will have changed. The output of just "ls -l" isn't sufficient since by default it doesn't show seconds, just minutes. Waiting for a file to stop changing is not a very elegant or reliable way to measure that some process is finished - if you know the process ID there are much better ways. This method will also give a false positive if the changes to the target file are delayed longer than the sleep interval for any reason (network timeouts, etc). But sometimes the process that is writing the file doesn't exit, rather it continues on doing something else, so this approach can be useful if you understand its limitations.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Lvextend logical volume
this command extends your logical volume. then it does a resize2fs on it as well. added the -r switch to make it launch resize.

Count number of bytes that are different between 2 binary files

Watch the disk fill up
While copying a large file that may take up a good chunk of your hard drive, start the copy and run this command concurrently. It will print out the disk information every second. It's pretty handy when you have a large copy with nothing to monitor the progress.

List all open ports and their owning executables
Particularly useful on OS X where netstat doesn't have -p option.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Simplest port scanner
Very handy way to perform a host scan if you don't have nmap,ncat,nc ...or other tools installed locally. When executing a command on a /dev/tcp/$host/$port pseudo-device file, Bash opens a TCP connection to the associated socket and UDP connection when using /dev/udp/$host/$port.A simlpe way to get servers banner is to run this command "cat < /dev/tcp/localhost/25" , here you will get mail server's banner. NOTE: Bash, as packaged for Debian, does not support using the /dev/tcp and /dev/udp pseudo-device it's not enabled by default Because bash in Debian is compiled with ?disable-net-redirections.

Partition a sequence of disk drives for LVM with fdisk
So, I'm using a CentOS VM in VirtualBox, and created four new disks in the SCSI controller. The VM created the folders: /dev/sda /dev/sdb /dev/sdc /dev/sdd Using a 'for loop' all disks are partitioned for LVM.


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