Commands by slashdot (6)

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Copy your SSH public key on a remote machine for passwordless login.
Should run on any system with ssh installed.

Delete all non-printing characters from a file
tr has some predefined sets of characters that are more convenient to use than characters codes

Find the package that installed a command

Convert unix timestamp to date
The "-d" option for gnu's "date" command can calculate positive or negative offset from any time, including "now". You can even specify a source timezone (the output timezone can be set with the TZ environment variable). Useful! Fun! Not very well documented!

Add all unversioned files to svn
No need for grep, let awk do the match. This will not behave properly if the filenames contains whitespace, which is awk's default field separator.

Efficiently print a line deep in a huge log file
Sed stops parsing at the match and so is much more effecient than piping head into tail or similar. Grab a line range using $ sed '999995,1000005!d' < my_massive_file

Mouse Tracking
Will track your mouse and save it to a file. You can use gnuplot to graph it: $ gnuplot -persist

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Find all files with root SUID or SGID executables
Discovering all executables on your system that can be run as another user, especially root, is critical for system security. The above command will find those files with have SUID or SGID bits set and are owned by the root user or group.

Easily search running processes (alias).


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