Commands by smilyface (1)

  • svn log -v --> takes log of all Filter1 -------- -r {from}{to} --> gives from and to revision Filter2 -------- awk of line 'r'with numbers Assign user=3rd column [ie; username] Filter3 -------- if username = George print details Filter4 -------- Print lines starts with M/U/G/C/A/D [* A Added * D Deleted * U Updated * G Merged * C Conflicted] Filter5 -------- sort all files Filter6 ------- Print only uniq file's name alone. Show Sample Output


    0
    svn log -v -r{2009-11-1}:HEAD | awk '/^r[0-9]+ / {user=$3} /./{if (user=="george") {print}}' | grep -E "^ M|^ G|^ A|^ D|^ C|^ U" | awk '{print $2}' | sort | uniq
    smilyface · 2011-12-05 07:36:44 0

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