Commands by sml (0)

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Find files and calculate size of result in shell
Use find's internal stat to get the file size then let the shell add up the numbers.

happened to find this not bad software to keep my files and folders safe! Even the free trial version has the fantastic functions to protect any private files from being seen by anyone except me. With it I can encrypt, hide or lock anything I want, amazin
I noticed some spammer posted an advertisement here for "not bad" encryption. Unfortunately, their software only runs under Microsoft Windows and fails to work from the commandline. My shell script improves upon those two aspects, with no loss in security, using the exact same "military-grade" encryption technology, which has the ultra-cool codename "ROT-13". For extra security, I recommend running ROT-13 twice.

find which lines in a file are longer than N characters
Filter out lines of input that contain 72, or fewer, characters. This uses bash only. ${#i} is the number of characters in variable i.

cd into another dir to run a one-liner, but implicitly drop back to your $OLD_PWD after
Obviously the example given is necessarily simple, but this command not only saves time on the command line (saves you using "cd -" or, worse, having to type a fully qualified path if your command cd's more than once), but is vital in scripts, where I've found the behaviour of "cd -" to be a little broken at times.

use screen as a terminal emulator to connect to serial consoles
Use GNU/screen as a terminal emulator for anything serial console related. screen /dev/tty eg. screen /dev/ttyS0 9600 MacOSX: http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20061109133825654 Cheat Sheet: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/screen-terminal-emulator-cheat-sheet/

Big Countdown Clock with hours, minutes and seconds
Figlet is easy to find for download on the internet, and works for any text. Quite cool.

Go to the Nth line of file

Don't spam root. Log your cronjob output to syslog
This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output. Advantages: * This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf * Reduce cron spam to root@localhost (Please stop spaming the sysadmins) * Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile. * Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example. * Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX

cd to (or operate on) a file across parallel directories
This is useful for quickly jumping around branches in a file system, or operating on a parellel file. This is tested in bash. cd to (substitute in PWD, a for b) where PWD is the bash environmental variable for the "working directory"

To create files with specific permission:


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