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Show this month's calendar, with today's date highlighted
Explanation: * The date command evaluated to today's date with blank padded on the left if single digit * The grep command search and highlight today's date * The --before-context and --after-context flags displays up to 6 lines before and after the line containing today's date; thus completes the calendar. I have tested this command on Mac OS X Leopard and Xubuntu 8.10

Find today created files

Top 20 commands in your bash history

Recursively find top 20 largest files (> 1MB) sort human readable format
Search for files and list the 20 largest. $ find . -type f gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.) $ -print0 | xargs -0 du -h separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456) $ | sort -hr use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K $ | head -20 finally only select the top twenty out of the list

Print the detailed statistics of transferred bytes by the firewall rules

pdfcount: get number of pages in a PDF file

Capitalize first letter of each word in a string
Capitalize first letter of each word in a string.

Find out when your billion-second anniversary is (was). (on OS X)
This is the same command as this one, but for OS X. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3053/find-out-when-your-billion-second-anniversary-is-was.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Create directory named after current date
Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless. In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'. This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name: $ alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'


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