Commands by sonic (8)

  • From the manpage: man less -X or --no-init Disables sending the termcap initialization and deinitialization strings to the terminal. This is sometimes desirable if the deinitialization string does something unnecessary, like clearing the screen. Bonus: If you want to clear the screen after viewing a file this way that had sensitive information, hit or just type clear. Since is readily available, I don't know why less bothers to automatically clear. If you're viewing the file at all, chances are you want to see the output from it after you quit. Show Sample Output


    2
    less -X /var/log/insecure
    sonic · 2016-06-24 13:53:49 3
  • The original command is great, but I often want to prepend to every line. Show Sample Output


    1
    sed -i 's/^/ls -l /' output_files.txt
    sonic · 2013-10-07 15:12:53 0
  • Prints line numbers making it easier to see long lines that wrap in your terminal and extra line breaks at the end of a file. :set nu works too. Show Sample Output


    0
    :set number
    sonic · 2013-10-07 15:03:52 0
  • If /home/sonic/archive/ was a symlink to /backup/sonic/archive it would follow the links and give you the file listing. By default find will NOT follow symbolic links. The default behavior for the find command is to treat the symlinks as literal files. I discovered this when trying to write a script run via cron to delete files with a modification time older than X days. The easiest solution was to use: /usr/bin/find -L /home/sonic/archive -name '*gz' -type f -mtime +14 -exec rm '{}' \; Show Sample Output


    -1
    find -L /home/sonic/archive -name '*gz' -type f
    sonic · 2013-10-07 14:32:22 0
  • the advantage to doing it this way is that you can adjust the max depth to get more recursive results and run it on non GNU systems. It also won't print trailing slashes, which can easily be removed, but can be slightly annoying.. You could run: # for file in `find * -maxdepth 0 -type d`;do ls -d $file;done and in the ls -d part of the command you can put in whatever parameters you want to get things like permissions, time stamps, and ownership. Show Sample Output


    0
    find * -maxdepth 0 -type d
    sonic · 2013-02-25 21:10:49 1
  • just an alternative to setting the size, this allows you to scroll up and see your previous commands in a given session but when you logout the history is not saved. That's the only advantage to doing it this way.. Show Sample Output


    0
    export HISTFILE=/dev/null
    sonic · 2013-02-18 16:37:01 0
  • To ignore aspect ratio, run: for file in *; do convert $file -resize 800x600! resized-$file; done and all images will be exactly 800x600. Use your shell of choice.. This was done in BASH. Show Sample Output


    0
    for file in *; do convert $file -resize 800x600 resized-$file; done
    sonic · 2013-02-17 21:37:14 0
  • I couldn't find this on the site and it's a useful switch. Great for large files. Show Sample Output


    2
    wget -c or wget --continue
    sonic · 2013-02-17 21:12:00 0

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Print a row of 50 hyphens
Perl is installed by default on most modern OS when jot is not.

Stoppable sleep
A nice way to interrupt a sleep with a signal.

Move all but the newest 100 emails to a gzipped archive

Working random fact generator
Though without infinite time and knowledge of how the site will be designed in the future this may stop working, it still will serve as a simple straight forward starting point. This uses the observation that the only item marked as strong on the page is the single logical line that includes the italicized fact. If future revisions of the page show failure, or intermittent failure, one may simply alter the above to read. $ wget randomfunfacts.com -O - 2>/dev/null | tee lastfact | grep \ | sed "s;^.*\(.*\).*$;\1;" The file lastfact, can then be examined whenever the command fails.

Set file access control lists
The file myfile is owned by tom and has read and write permissions for tom. Group and other permissions are empty which make myfile readable and writable only by tom. setfacl enables user tom to give read permission to user john only. The command 'ls -l' shows a '+' sign telling us that file access control list has been setup for myfile.

diff the same file in two directories.
This is useful when you're diffing two files of the same name in radically different directory trees. For example: Set $ path1='/some/long/convoluted/path/to/all/of/your/source/from/a/long/dead/machine' then $ path2='/local/version/of/same/file' then run the command. Much easier on the eyes when you're looking back across your command history, especially if you're doing the same diff over and over again.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Create iso image of cd/dvd

Commandline document conversion with Libreoffice
In this example, the docx gets converted to Open Document .odt format. For other formats, you'll need to specify the correct filter (Hint: see "Comments" link below for a nice list).

Make a server's console beep when the network is down
This is like ping -a, but it does the opposite. It alerts you if the network is down, not up. Note that the beep will be from the speaker on the server, not from your terminal. Once a second, this script checks if the Internet is accessible and beeps if it is not. I define the Net as being "UP", if I can ping Google's public DNS server (8.8.8.8), but of course you could pick a different static IP address. I redirect the beep to /dev/console so that I can run this in the background from /etc/rc.local. Of course, doing that requires that the script is run by a UID or GID that has write permissions to /dev/console (usually only root). Question: I am not sure if the -W1 flag works under BSD. I have only tested this under GNU/Linux using ping from iputils. If anybody knows how portable -W is, please post a comment.


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