Commands by sorpigal (3)

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for all flv files in a dir, grab the first frame and make a jpg.
This is handy for making screenshots of all your videos for referring to in your flv player.

Check if a string is into a variable
Returns true (0) if the string is into $var, or false (1) if not.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Advanced python tracing
Trace python statement execution and syscalls invoked during that simultaneously

Sets shell timeout
Useful in root's .profile - will auto-logout after TMOUT seconds of inactivity. Close after `seconds` inactive. export TMOUT=seconds (unefunge)

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

list files recursively by size

Run a command after the process you choose finishes
Run a command as soon as another long-running command finishes. E.g. suspend the machine after performing apt upgrade. The process is selected interactively via fzf.

Search for a single file and go to it
This command looks for a single file named emails.txt which is located somewhere in my home directory and cd to that directory. This command is especially helpful when the file is burried deep in the directory structure. I tested it against the bash shells in Xubuntu 8.10 and Mac OS X Leopard 10.5.6


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