Commands by sputnick (42)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

A child process which survives the parent's death (for sure)
Test scenario: * Open xterm (or konsole, ...) * Start xeyes with: ( xeyes & ) * Close the xterminal The xeyes process should be still running.

increase recursively the modification time for a list of files
Increase the modification date for the files selected with the find command.

find files in a date range
Example above will recursively find files in current directory created/modified in 2010.

Replace spaces in filenames with underscores
I realize there's a few of these out there, but none exactly in this form, which seems the cleanest to me

Top 10 requestors by IP address from Apache/NCSA Logs

floating point operations in shell scripts
allows you to use floating point operations in shell scripts

Set an alarm to wake up [2]
Set an alarm to starts in specific time.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Search commandlinefu and view syntax-highlighted results in vim
Here is the full function (got trunctated), which is much better and works for multiple queries. function cmdfu () { local t=~/cmdfu; until [[ -z $1 ]]; do echo -e "\n# $1 {{{1" >> $t; curl -s "commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$1/`echo -n $1|base64`/plaintext" | sed '1,2d;s/^#.*/& {{{2/g' | tee -a $t > $t.c; sed -i "s/^# $1 {/# $1 - `grep -c '^#' $t.c` {/" $t; shift; done; vim -u /dev/null -c "set ft=sh fdm=marker fdl=1 noswf" -M $t; rm $t $t.c } Searches commandlinefu for single/multiple queries and displays syntax-highlighted, folded, and numbered results in vim.

Jump to a directory, execute a command and jump back to current dir


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: