Commands by stanishjohnd (3)

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Create a file server, listening in port 7000
At client side: tar c myfile | nc localhost 7000 ##Send file myfile to server tar c mydir | nc localhost 7000 ## Send directory mydir to server

output the contents of a file removing any empty lines including lines which contain only spaces or tabs.

bash screensaver off

Generate random valid mac addresses
First set the variable $hexchars: $hexchars="0123456789ABCDEF" Change the number in the first for loop if you need less then 1200 mac addresses

Delete all files by extension
This is a correction to https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/22134 Use `-name` instead of `-iname`, because case-sensitivity is probably important when we're dealing with filenames. It's true that extensions are often capitalised (e.g., "something.JPG"), so choose whatever's appropriate. However, what is appropriate is the quoting of the name pattern, so the shell doesn't expand it incorrectly. Finally, `-delete` is clearer.

Download all Red Hat Manuals - A better way by user Flatcap
Let's give Flatcap credit for this elegant solution, instead of leaving it hidden as a comment. Tested on RHEL6 and it works. Nice and clean.

Monitor TCP opened connections

Rename all .jpeg and .JPG files to have .jpg extension
the "i" controls case sensitiveness. It's slightly inefficient since it uselessly renames .jpg to .jpg, but that's more than compensated by launching only one process instead of two, besides being shorter to write.

Find top 5 big files
zsh: list of files sorted by size, greater than 100mb, head the top 5. '**/*' is recursive, and the glob qualifiers provide '.' = regular file, 'L' size, which is followed by 'm' = 'megabyte', and finally '+100' = a value of 100

Fast tape rewind
Traditionally we rewind a tape using this syntaxis: $ mt -f /dev/rmt/0cbn rewind Redirecting the dispositive to nothing as shown above is faster. Less typing is always better.


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