Commands by starchox (26)

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Convert IP octets to HEX with no dots.
Converts IP octets to hex using printf command. Useful for generating pxeboot aliases in the pxelinux.cfg folder.

move a lot of files over ssh
copy files to a ssh server with gzip compression

list all crontabs for users
additionally use "find /etc/cron*" for cronscripts

Quick find function
A function that allows you to perform a case-insensitive search in the current directory, and directories in the current directory (but no further), for files containing the first argument anywhere in their names.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Get the number of days in a given month and year

Find and copy scattered mp3 files into one directory
This command copies all filenames in the current dir and subdirs that end in .mp3 regardless of case (also matches .MP3 .mP3 and .Mp3) It copies all the files to the "mp3" folder in your home directory. If you want to see the files that are beeing copied, replace "cp {}" with "cp -v {}"

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

List the libraries used by an application
For example, you need to make a copy of all the libraries that a certain application uses, with this command you can list and copy them.


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